Press

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On Monday 5 November 2018, CEEP General Secretary Valeria Ronzitti addressed the Macro-Economic Dialogue, in presence of Mario Centeno, ECB President, Valdis Dombrovskis, European Commission Vice-President, and Hartwig Löger, Austrian Minister of Finance.

Addressing the potential of digitalisation to support the economic recovery and the EU competitiveness, Valeria Ronzitti highlighted the following priorities:

Digitalisation to modernise Public Services and SGIs: “Public services’ enterprises in all sectors are on a firm path towards digitalisation, as it can contribute to reaching cost reduction targets, to driving productivity and quality, and to allowing organisations to refocus on delivering critical public services.”

Digitalisation calls for new skills needs: “For Public services’ employers, many public services’ jobs are forecast to be displaced because of automation by 2030. However, it is clear that digitalisation will imply an increased demand for new skills, both digital skills and soft skills such as analytical, social and entrepreneurial skills. This will lead to a great need for the upskilling and reskilling of employees.”

Digitalisation and the need for a level-playing field: “The digital transformation of public services will require large investments in the public sector. These are investments that will come on top of investments in infrastructure and human capital and could have an impact on the growth and stability pact. One way to meet the demands for increased investments is to allow public services’ enterprises to follow the same deduction rules for investments as private companies”.

Reacting to the final “State of the European Union” speech by Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker, CEEP General Secretary Valeria Ronzitti commented:

”The President of the European Commission remained loyal to his style, restating and confirming his ambition to have a political role and to achieve tangible results. We agree that the priority should now be to complete the on-going legislative processes, such as the Energy Union and the climate policy, the Banking and the Capital Markets Union or the development of the Digital Single Market.”

“We call upon the European Commission to push for, at the very least, an agreement in principle between the EU institutions on the next Multiannual Financial Framework, ahead of the European elections in 2019. Employers and providers of public services and SGIs needs a clear and predictable financial framework to plan necessary future investments, both in physical infrastructures and human capital.”

“We also stand ready to support the Commission in promoting its communication on free and fair European elections. As providers of key essential services, our members are well-trusted by citizens, and we are ready to go beyond our “ordinary” mandate to strengthen democracy and reinforce the EU added-value.”

Joint Social Partners’ Final Report “Promoting social partnership in employee training”– PDF

Key summary

  • Rapid labour market changes such as the industry 4.0 revolution, digitalisation, social, demographic and environmental transitions and global challenges require joint actions on improving employee training. A skilled workforce is one of the main assets of the European social and economic model and this should be further developed to cope with the challenges posed by the future of work. Education, training and lifelong learning was reaffirmed as a priority by European heads of state and government while proclaiming the European Pillar of Social Rights in November 2017. Support for training to adults provides benefits for workers, employers and the whole of society.
  • There are many different national laws, rules and approaches to the organisation and provision of employee training. Some countries have wide-ranging and strong vocational training policies set in legislation, while in others training provisions are set by collective agreements, at various levels, or agreed directly between employers and employees in the workplace. Opportunities to access training can also be dependent on the size of the company/workplace. Access to effective employee training should be facilitated while respecting the diversity and flexibility of systems, which vary according to diverse industrial relations practices.
  • Financing levels and mechanisms of employee training vary significantly across Europe. This reflects the different levels of economic development in the Member States, but also different choices and responsibilities of the actors. Whatever the financing model, an important success factor is the involvement of social partners and the cooperative attitude between them when it comes to the management of funding, time and human resources. Improvements to national education and training systems could be further fostered through targeted financial support to Member States as part of the European semester process.
  • Employee training can contribute towards creating a good working environment, which ensures employees’ well-being in their work, motivates them, and enables them to progress in their career and earnings. In turn, employers benefit from the enhanced motivation and productivity of their workforce and overall businesses performance. This means that there is a shared interest and a shared responsibility of employers and employees to contribute to upskilling and reskilling, leading to successful enterprises and an appropriately skilled
    workforce.
  • Because they take an active role and have direct knowledge and experience of both labour and training markets, social partners are well placed to foster a diversified offer of training options in the search for the best possible fit with employers’ and workers’ needs on the labour market.
  • Social dialogue and collective agreements, in particular at the sectoral level, play an important role in the governance of training systems and in creating training opportunities and improving the relevance and provision of employee training. This includes social partners working together to foster transition and career paths between sectors. The establishment of training funds has occurred in several Member States and can play an important role.
  • Paid time off for work-relevant training and a right to training are established practices in some Member States. In such cases, social partners play a role in facilitating employees’ effective access to training. This could provide inspiration for other countries, depending on the national context. Employee training should be of high quality, effective and equally relevant for the worker and the employer. It should respond to the need for improving professional, soft and transversal skills and contribute to workplace and industry-related career development. Employee training offers should also respond to new and emerging developments in labour markets and enterprises. These offers should be tailor-made, innovative in terms of new training methods, take into account work organisation and be delivered online, where appropriate, and in a work-based environment. In addition, it should be accessible and benefit from pooling/mutualised resources within and between sectors.
  • Training provisions must be designed in a way that fosters and supports mobility between and within sectors. Securing these transitions benefits workers’ employability and employers’ capacity to attract new recruits.
  • The changes and transitions in the labour market require effective upskilling and reskilling, according to identified needs, and defined by labour market intelligence tools and social partner involvement at all appropriate levels, so as to respond to the existing and future skills demand identified by employers and trade unions across sectors and occupations. A good match between the training offer and enterprises’ need for an increasingly skilled workforce is a key condition for employers to offer training and for workers to access training and remain in quality employment while continued digitalisation, automation, and artificial intelligence changes their everyday work.
  • Employee training should be seen as an overall approach within which there may be a need for a targeted approach to specific groups. In such cases, and as part of the wider approach to active labour market policies, Member States should provide effective and systematic support including financial resources for training that supports the integration of the low-skilled, unemployed and socio-economically disadvantaged groups in the labour market, in particular migrants and refugees, via employee training and adult apprenticeships. The training needs of older workers and of NEETs in particular should also be taken into account. As part of this, Member States should ensure the implementation of the upskilling pathways Council recommendation with the effective involvement of social partners, as applicable.
  • Training schemes, developed with the involvement of the social partners, should aim to decrease the gender gap in certain professions, support women’s career development, and to ensure that they can also reach high-level and managerial positions where they are disproportionally under-represented. It is also important to encourage more women to study STEM subjects.

Following the presentation of the European Commission’s Data Package 2018 [on 25 April], CEEP General Secretary Valeria Ronzitti commented on the proposal for a Review of the Directive on the Reuse of Public Sector Information (PSI):

CEEP supports the European Commission’s overall objective to set a European regulatory framework that fosters the development of the European data economy. We however have reservations on the proposal for a revision of the PSI Directive as it leads to legal uncertainty regarding ongoing innovation and investments by public services’ enterprises.

 The Commission’s proposals to differentiate between, on the one hand, data hold by public undertakings and, on the other hand, government data or content owned by cultural institutes, go in the right direction. Indeed, they are not the same as public undertakings’ dynamic services requiring constant reinvestment and adaptation to a competitive market.

 Nevertheless, the proposed revision widens the scope of the original PSI Directive to public undertakings in new sectors such as water, energy, transport and postal services. This creates an important distortion of competition between public undertakings and private companies which are not included in its scope but operate on the same markets.

 As the companies which mostly benefit from open datasets are large platforms that want to compete with European local, regional and national public services’ enterprises, it is essential to create a level-playing field also in this regard to protect the rights and the existing high-quality of the services provided by public undertakings.

 Public services’ enterprises must deliver their services in a cost-efficient way. As such, they should in no way be forced to give out value for free or at marginal costs to other enterprises. We fear that the EC proposal about future delegated acts could force public undertakings to make high-value datasets available for free. This would hinder ongoing innovation in public services’ enterprises by creating legal uncertainty and making investments in own data sets and existing cooperation with start-ups unstable and risky.”

At the Macro-Economic Dialogue today (6th November, full speech here), CEEP General Secretary Valeria Ronzitti called for a further deepening and reform of the Economic and Monetary Union (EMU). “The EMU represents a major step in strengthening the European project, and will lead to real convergence, meaning sustainable growth and employment“ explained Ms Ronzitti.

Ms Ronzitti highlighted a three-step approach to reach this goal:

  1. Completing the Banking Union: it remains the flagship of the EMU and would show that governments and EU institutions learnt the lessons of the financial crisis. The European Commission has already done everything possible to unlock the current deadlock around the European Deposit Insurance Scheme. “The ball is now in the camp of Member States and we hope that President Tusk will create momentum at the upcoming December EuroSummit to reach an agreement at intergovernmental level in June”, said Ms Ronzitti.
  2. Creating a macroeconomic Stabilisation function: CEEP strongly favours the development of a European Investment Protection Scheme. In times of crisis, public investments are the first to be cut from national budgets, and this has extremely negative consequences on future growth, employment and productivity. Such a scheme would protect well identified investments and show that EU and national institutions learnt the lessons.
  3. Reinforcing the European Semester: there should be a constant effort to reinforce the European Semester, which is the best tool to allow a real balance between economic and social dimensions in the EMU with a focus on upward convergence. Integrating a governance structure on social issues into the EMU governance would support and guide Eurozone members based on commonly agreed standards, while leaving Member States’ room for decisions on their specific social policies. Structural reforms will still be needed, but can only succeed if they meet two requirements:
    • To systematically involve social partners, as a guarantee for legitimacy, fairness and democratic accountability, and support for social partners’ capacity-building activities;
    • To be geared up towards productivity growth, partly supported by EU funds to boost long term investment; to reach this goal, it is crucial for the EU to be empowered with a strong Multi-Annual Financial Framework, able to support national reforms efficiently, while allowing for a better link with the EU Semester’s priorities.

At the Tripartite Social Summit, in presence of European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker, Council President Donald Tusk and Estonian Prime Minister Jüri Ratas, CEEP Vice-President Milena Angelova and General Secretary Valeria Ronzitti presented the views of employers of public services on the future of the EU.

“We need to reconcile EU’s economic and social dimensions. Public services’ employers will work with EU institutions and Member States to create a strong skeleton of modernised and high-performing public services to reconnect citizens and enterprises with the EU project. The Pillar of Social Rights contains strong elements for the development of public services, which we strongly support.”

 

“CEEP also published today its Pulse of Public Services. Its main finding is that a strong investment policy is needed. Public services are strengthening the resilience of our economy. Investment in education is key element to foster productivity developments. Investment in healthcare will ensure that we properly mitigate the consequences of demographic ageing. And physical infrastructures are the one which enables businesses to evolve in a changing and competitive environment.”

 

“On top of investment, one of the key condition to ensure to get back to stable and sustainable economic and social progress remains the swift completion of the banking, economic and political union. Nothing less than the completion of the Economic and Monetary Union will structurally lift Europe out of the crisis. And we should not lose sight of the agenda set up by the Commission for the future of Europe.“

CEEP took part on Friday 24 March in an Extraordinary Meeting between EU Social Partners and EU Institutions in Rome, opening the celebrations for the 60th anniversary of the Treaty of Rome. EU social partners presented to Presidents Juncker and Tusk, to Commissioners Thyssen and Dombrovskis and to the Prime Ministers of Italy, Malta, Estonia and Sweden, a joint statement, “declaring their full commitment to the European Union and dedication to continuing to contribute to a successful project and united Europe that delivers for its workers and enterprises.”

During the meeting, CEEP Vice-President Filippo Brandolini said:

CEEP is honoured to be associated to the 60th Anniversary of the Rome Treaty. This involvement is for us a clear sign of the new political will of the Council and Commission to involve Social Partners in the crucial decisions being made for the future of Europe.”

Mr Brandolini emphasised three key priorities for CEEP:

Europe shall not be reduced to the single market. This would be in contradiction with all the work we have been doing for decades as a social partner to foster social Europe. That is why the right balance between the economic and social dimensions of the EU needs to be achieved. A key step in that direction will be for the reflection on the future of the European Social model and of the Economic and Monetary Union to go hand in hand. Member States should never favour one at the expense of the development of the other.”

 

A key foundation for the European project should be its infrastructures, both physical and social. Our main instrument to accomplish this remains an ambitious and responsible investment policy fully supported by our rules and engagements.  We will continue to make proposals to facilitate investments in key public services infrastructures. We need to be smart about this and remember that we can find social progress beyond technicity, for instance by codifying a clear distinction between operational expenditure and investments and allowing for a long-term horizon. This is for us the meaning of “smart reading of fiscal rules”, which you can find in the social partners’ joint statement.”

 

Through Social dialogue, we will ensure social market economy better supports employers and workers. Social partners have a key role to play not only through consultations by contributing to government policy making, but also and mainly by directly shaping industrial relations and labour markets through negotiations. We are very pleased that this meeting creates a bridge with the Social Summit scheduled in November, where we are sure that the role of social partners will be strongly reaffirmed.”

CEEP delegation in Rome was composed of Filippo Brandolini (Vice-President), Valeria Ronzitti (General Secretary), Joseph Farrugia (President of CEEP Maltese Section) and Kristin Ivarsson (CEEP Sweden).

sans-titre

The European social partners gathered in Rome on the invitation of the Italian government, the Maltese Presidency, the Presidencies of the European Council and the European Commission, to celebrate the 60th anniversary of the Treaty of Rome, solemnly declare their full commitment to the European Union and dedication to continuing to contribute to a successful project and united Europe that delivers for its workers and enterprises.

Seven decades of peace and stability in Europe is an historic achievement. The European Union, which created a union among the peoples of Europe and, step by step, tied together European States with a common purpose, made this possible.

Europe is faced with many economic, social and political challenges: lack of inclusive, balanced and sustainable growth, insufficient competitiveness and employment creation, inequalities, exceptional migration flows, security issues, and the need to redefine EU-UK relations. These challenges require ambitious European solutions. Together, the European Union and its member states have the means to provide common answers, show solidarity, and make a difference in a moment of geopolitical instability, economic problems, rising populism and extremism. Only united are we strong at the global level.

European social partners strongly believe in the European Union. Populism, nationalism, xenophobia, anti-European sentiments, isolationism or protectionism come from poor economic and social performance and people’s fears about the future. This should be addressed through a serious, fact-based, transparent, and open-debate, and concrete initiatives that can improve workers and companies’ everyday life, thereby preventing a downward spiral that will damage everyone. European and national commitment can and must go hand-in hand.

Our social market economies combine free markets, private initiative, economic freedoms, free movement of people and social rights, a well-functioning welfare state and high-performing public services. Both economic and social cohesion should be improved. A particular effort is needed to lift up our youth, to give them back prospects of a bright future, to demonstrate the benefits of the European project.

Europe has the most highly developed social systems in the world and it will continue to be so provided we ensure that the European social model is made more robust and sustainable with the active support of social partners. Providing equal opportunities and addressing inequalities in the labour market and society, increasing levels of employment participation and social inclusion, is part of the answer to greater economic prosperity and better social outcomes in the EU.

A well-functioning social dialogue at EU, national, sectoral and company level is important to devise efficient policies that will increase European prosperity and ensure social fairness.

To increase prosperity, giving room for more and better employment opportunities for all generations, we need to improve Europe’s attractiveness as a place to invest and create jobs. After a decade of under-investment, increasing efficient and productive private and public investment is essential for Europe’s present and future growth and employment. We need to achieve a proper balance between our stabilisation and sustainability needs including, where public investment is concerned, through a smart reading of our fiscal rules. In parallel with the extension of the so-called Juncker Plan for Investment, EU and national efforts to remove obstacles to investment, entrepreneurship and job creation in Europe must be stepped up.

To reverse the relative decline of European industry and given the importance of manufacturing as a growth and job creation driver in all sectors of the economy, including services, we call on the European Union to urgently put in place an ambitious industrial policy strategy. Our main competitors are not waiting. The time for action is now.

High performing public services must be fostered and we also urgently need a dynamic EU SME action agenda. The EU must support competitiveness and innovation, while managing transition processes towards the digital, low carbon and circular economy. We also need a strong skeleton of modernised and efficient public services able to reconnect citizens and enterprises with the European project while promoting social and territorial cohesion.

Having efficient European institutions is essential to have a well-functioning Economic and Monetary Union and devise balanced and effective European policies benefiting all Member States enterprises and workers. Europe needs transparent, democratically accountable and well-performing institutions. The European social partners count on the European Commission, the Council and the European Parliament to be united and work together to improve the capacity of the European Union to address enterprises’ and workers’ needs and expectations. We stand ready to support you in this endeavour.

PDF Version

At the Tripartite Social Summit, in presence of European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker, Council President Donald Tusk and Maltese Prime Minister Joseph Muscat, CEEP General Secretary Valeria Ronzitti and the President of CEEP Maltese Section Joseph Farrugia presented the views of employers of public services on the future of the EU and charting the course towards growth, employment and fairness.

 “You can be sure of our commitment to contribute to upcoming debates and reflection papers on the Future of the EU, in particular on the social dimension and on the deepening of the EMU. The Commission’s guiding principle in this regard must be: ”economic policies are social policies, and social policies are economic policies”, to quote Commissioner Thyssen.”

 

“CEEP will also consult its members on which option or combination of options we favour from the White Paper on the Future of the EU. But we can already exclude scenario 2 – the reduction of the EU to the sole Single Market – as it goes against our ”raison d’être”, both as social partners and as providers of SGI. The Single Market is a tool to achieve sustainable growth, social and territorial cohesion. It is NOT an end in itself.”

 

“President Tusk, the Council now has a great responsibility, as the Commission’s White Paper rightly puts the debate in your hands. In this regard, our wish in CEEP is that you will not leave the debate on the Future of the EU before having collected 27 signatures, starting from the upcoming Rome Declaration.”

 

“There is now a need to set up a framework to foster investment and financing the real economy, including public services. According to our Pulse of Public Services, 44% of the respondents are still reporting difficulties to fund their activities as one of their top challenges. Member States with fiscal space should enable necessary investment in public infrastructure and Member States who have been granted flexibility have to use it for long term investment, and not for short-term priorities.”

After nine months of negotiations, EU employers and trade unions approved a framework agreement on active-agein and an intergenerational approach.

The agreement is to ensure a healthy, safe and productive working environment and work organisation to enable workers of all ages to remain in work until legal retirement age. It is to facilitate the transfer of knowledge and experience between generations at the workplace and takes into account the changing national demographic and labour market realities.

BusinessEurope, UEAPME, CEEP and the ETUC signed and handed over the agreement to European Commission President Juncker, European Council President Tusk and the Maltese Prime Minister Muscat on Wednesday 8 March during the signature ceremony.

This agreement will be implemented by the members of the signatory organisations across Europe.

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